Heads Up. Sun’s Down. NIGHTSCRIPT, Vol. I, Table of Contents Announced

Nightscript

In his introduction to Daniel Mills’ haunting debut collection, The Lord Came at Twilight, Simon Stranzas noted, “In some way, the last great revolution in horror was its rediscovery of its past.”

Make no mistake, just because certain camps of weird- and horror-related writers keep those strange homefires burning doesn’t mean the medium grows stale.  In fact, think of this past-present relationship as a Mobius strip, ribbons of prescient visions braided with thematic cords from our predecessors.  Echoes, if harnessed properly, have the capability of providing new momentum—new dimension.

As the editorial helmer of the annually-planned Nightscript, C.M. Muller is guiding us into steady—though nightshaded—waters.  And owing to his well-read awareness, we should accompany with confidence.

There are no tricks here, folks.  Muller is a mensch who knows his stuff.  If he hasn’t read it, he’s heard of it.  If he doesn’t own an obscure copy of a critical text, it’s probably because he’s kindly sent it along (gratis) to an acquaintance with kindred tastes.

Sure, I’m beyond honored to hold court with my fellow Nightscripters; but I’m also eager to see where—over the next few burnt-orange, smoke-scented Octobers—Muller has in mind to take us.  You’d do well to follow…

Nightscript, Vol. I—TOC:

“Everything That’s Underneath” — Kristi DeMeester
“Strays” — Gregory L. Norris
“In His Grandmother’s Coat” — Charles Wilkinson
“The Cuckoo Girls” — Patricia Lillie
“The Sound That the World Makes” — David Surface
“Below the Falls” — Daniel Mills
“The Keep” — Kirsty Logan
“She Rose From the Water” — Kyle Yadlosky
“Animalhouse” — Clint Smith
“Tooth, Tongue, and Claw” — Damien Angelica Walters
“Momma” — Eric J. Guignard
“The Trees Are Tall Here” — Marc E. Fitch
“A Quiet Axe” — Michael Kelly
“The Death of Yatagarasu” — Bethany W. Pope
“The Cooing” — John Claude Smith
“A Knife in My Drawer” — Zdravka Evtimova
“On Balance” — Jason A. Wyckoff
“Learning Not to Smile” — Ralph Robert Moore
“Fisher and Lure” — Christopher Burke
“The Death of Socrates” — Michael Wehunt

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Yeah. It’s Time.

WHEN IT'S TIME FOR DEAD THINGS TO DIE - Cover

And when we say limited we mean limited.  My novella, When It’s Time For Dead Things To Die, is slated for release through Dunham’s Manor Press, an imprint of Dynatox Ministries.

From the publisher:  This chapbook novella is limited to 50 copies, half of which will be available here on the store, and half in the Indiegogo campaign.

Things are in decline…for Joseph Lowe, a rootless young man who falls for the wrong girl; for Gregory Bath, an aristocratic magnate who spares Lowe an almost certain death for his “transgression,” imposing upon him a kind of parasitic servitude. Now working as a line cook at Bath’s legendary Tudor Quoin, as well as catering to the growing needs of a man far older than he seems, Lowe desperately seeks release from a trap which has ensnared him for the past nine months. But who could possibly escape a family as powerful, as influential, or as far-reaching as the Baths? In the end, choices must be made, sides must be drawn, and for Lowe this means discovering an unlikely salvation between himself and his captor, as well as learning the true meaning of “family.”

Special thanks to Jordan Krall.

Dead On.

Latest installment of Dead Reckonings now available via Hippocampus Press. Review of Ghouljaw and Other Stories by Robert Butterfield: “A Tale of Two (Word)Smiths.” From the review:

“‘Dirt on Vicky’ is another standout — a mix of psychological and supernatural horror that further showcases Smith’s fine writing. Set shortly before Halloween in a small Midwestern town, the story allows Smith to demonstrate that he can capture that particular seasonal feel as well as anyone.”

Dead Reckonings 16, Fall, 2014

“And those eyes…” Cover artist, Jared Boggess, provides insight into GHOULJAW renderings

Ghouljaw - lettering, Boggess

Lettering by Jared Boggess

In a recent post on his website, cover artist, Jared Boggess, writes about his strategy for executing the project, and graciously provides some initial, illustrative drafts.

Ghouljaw - rough draft, Boggess

Ghoulish Sketch by Jared Boggess

Here’s an excerpt from his post:

“The centerpiece of this collection of short horrors follows a young man tormented by series of hallucinations and dreams. Clint Smith beautifully depicts a surreal dream experience in which this young man finds himself swallowed by the ocean haunted by an apparition known as the Ghouljaw.”

ghouljaw-cover-v1

Stop by Boggess’s site — there are plenty of impressive pieces of eye candy from his numerous projects:  www.jaredboggess.com

 

 

GHOULJAW: Cover Art Revealed

Well, my friends, here it is…

ghouljaw-cover-v1

Cover art by Jared Boggess

Tremendous gratitude to the amazing Jared Boggess who’s created this bullseye of a cover.  And I’d like to thank Derrick Hussey at Hippocampus Press for snagging this guy.  Do yourself a favor and get to know Boggess’s artwork—click over to his website:  www.jaredboggess.com.

One last thing:  the first review (that I’m aware of) for Ghouljaw and Other Stories is available on the Risingshadow website—click on the photo below to read the review:

ballon ghouljaw

Found: New Bethel library, circa 1986

Stay tuned form more updates:  @clintsmithtales and on Facebook: www.facebook.com/Ghouljaw

WELCOME TO NEW BETHEL…

UPDATE: Ghouljaw and Other Stories:  Book Trailer

Hey, comrades—a couple of pieces of communique:

 

ghoul with text 2

One: The book trailer for Ghouljaw and Other Stories is now available for viewing on YouTube. Follow this:  Ghouljaw book trailer

Take note of the music which was composed by Kell (of Shadeland fame), who’s created a soundtrack of fourteen songs as a supplement to each story. The soundtrack will be available on iTunes, Spotify, cdbaby, and other locations in the upcoming weeks.

And two: some preliminary artwork has appeared on the Ghouljaw purchase page at the Hippocampus Press website. I’m fortunate to say that the cover artist is the impressive Jared Boggess. You should drop by his site to see what this guy is all about:  www.jaredboggess.com.

That’s all for now. Stay tuned.

Weird Fiction Review, Issue 1

No foolin’—this is out today

It’s like the arguments of some ardent audiophiles, those enthusiast that (in the digital age of aimlessly yanking a song or two from some disreputable source, absently arranging them in some arbitrary order) maintain that vinyl is the only way to go:  The listener forfeits the essence of the album—the liner notes, the song-to-song sequence, the warmth of the music.  Same could be said for downloading a book or short story.  Easy? Sure.  Convenient? Without doubt.  But think about what you’re missing out on—the art, the weight, the feel of the book.

Okay—yes, so I own a Kindle; but stay with me.  There are some publications which still honor a bygone era of storytelling, aesthetically impressive journals whose sole purpose is to appeal to both our sense of tactility and our imagination.

The Weird Fiction Review, Issue I, is a piece of publishing artwork—a glossy, flap-cover paperback containing 225 pages and a sixteen-page, full color gallery of David Ho’s vibrantly lurid images.  “The Weird Fiction Review is designed to promote serious scholarship in weird and supernatural fiction from the Gothic novels to the present day,” writes S.T. Joshi in his opening editorial, “with an emphasis on the literature of the late nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries.

Fiction contributors include Michaels Aronovitz, Cody Goodfellow, Joseph S. Pulver, Sr., Mare Laidlow, Jason C. Eckhardt, along with yours truly.  There are also eight essays (the focuses of which include Lovecraft, Poe, Blackwood, Stoker, and Gaiman, to name a few), and five poets offering weird work.

Leviathan by David Ho

In the spirit of bygone journals and (sadly) defunct periodicals which prided themselves on promoting the tradition of supernatural tales, S.T. Joshi’s Weird Fiction Review provides a darkly disturbing glimpse at the past, present, and future of dark fiction.

Follow this link to Centipede Press:  www.centipedepress.com

Or check out Amazon.com:  www.amazon.com

And follow this link to David Ho’s website:  www.davidho.com

As always:  thanks for reading, and thank you for your support.