WEIRD FICTION REVIEW #9 Now Available

wfr9

Weird Fiction Review #9 (Centipede Press, 2018), Cover Art by Colin Nitta

With last year’s passing of the illustrating titan Stan Lee, it’s suitable to celebrate his voice and verve (along with the great Jack Kirby) with the cover art of Centipede Press‘s latest installment of Weird Fiction Review, which offers a wry wink to the inaugural, 1961 issue of the Fantastic Four (released fifty-seven years ago this past November).  The odd quad featured on the cover are, of course, notables from the Weird field, with Caitlin Kiernan standing in for Sue Storm, Victor Lavalle repping the Human Torch, Stephen Graham Jones taking on Mister Fantastic, and Laird Barron depicted as (suitably, noting his affinity for the Carpenter film) The Thing.  The list price is $35, but Centipede Press’s site currently has it for $22.

Weird-Fan side by side

Weird Fiction Review #9 (Centipede Press, 2018) / The Fantastic Four, Vol. 1, Issue #1 (1961)

“The Weird Fiction Review,” goes the site’s synopsis, “is an annual periodical devoted to the study of weird and supernatural fiction. It is edited by S.T. Joshi. This ninth issue contains fiction, poetry, and reviews from leading writers and promising newcomers. This issue features fiction by Caitl’n R. Kiernan, Laird Barron, Victor LaValle, Stephen Graham Jones, Scott Bradfield and others, and articles by Stefan Dziemianowicz (an illustrated history of Gnome Press), Adam Groves (on surrealist horror novels), John C. Tibbetts (on Marjorie Bowen), as well as verse and other essays and fiction. The feature of the issue is Chad Hensley’s outstanding article on H.R. Giger-inspired Alien toys.”

Giger

Brown University, Dec., 2018

Adam Golaski and Clint Smith, Brown University, December, 2018

In addition to a lengthy interview with author David Mitchell, Weird Fiction Review #9 also contains an exchange between Adam Golaski and me — an interview, of sorts, conducted by the Brown University English lecturer back in the fall of 2017.  The several weeks of correspondence was really an ideal way to get to know this writer who, perhaps, thrives in his obscurity.  We were able to spend a brief amount of time attempting to catch up back in December, 2018, on the Brown campus (shortly before our reading at the Arcade Asylum Author Series, Krampusnacht edition, at Lovecraft Arts & Sciences Council).

My story, “The Pecking Order” (a tale which begins with a young woman attending a former student’s funeral, but transforms into something appalling) can also be found in Weird Fiction Review #9.

 

WFR9

 

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Heads Up. Sun’s Down. NIGHTSCRIPT, Vol. I, Table of Contents Announced

Nightscript

In his introduction to Daniel Mills’ haunting debut collection, The Lord Came at Twilight, Simon Stranzas noted, “In some way, the last great revolution in horror was its rediscovery of its past.”

Make no mistake, just because certain camps of weird- and horror-related writers keep those strange homefires burning doesn’t mean the medium grows stale.  In fact, think of this past-present relationship as a Mobius strip, ribbons of prescient visions braided with thematic cords from our predecessors.  Echoes, if harnessed properly, have the capability of providing new momentum—new dimension.

As the editorial helmer of the annually-planned Nightscript, C.M. Muller is guiding us into steady—though nightshaded—waters.  And owing to his well-read awareness, we should accompany with confidence.

There are no tricks here, folks.  Muller is a mensch who knows his stuff.  If he hasn’t read it, he’s heard of it.  If he doesn’t own an obscure copy of a critical text, it’s probably because he’s kindly sent it along (gratis) to an acquaintance with kindred tastes.

Sure, I’m beyond honored to hold court with my fellow Nightscripters; but I’m also eager to see where—over the next few burnt-orange, smoke-scented Octobers—Muller has in mind to take us.  You’d do well to follow…

Nightscript, Vol. I—TOC:

“Everything That’s Underneath” — Kristi DeMeester
“Strays” — Gregory L. Norris
“In His Grandmother’s Coat” — Charles Wilkinson
“The Cuckoo Girls” — Patricia Lillie
“The Sound That the World Makes” — David Surface
“Below the Falls” — Daniel Mills
“The Keep” — Kirsty Logan
“She Rose From the Water” — Kyle Yadlosky
“Animalhouse” — Clint Smith
“Tooth, Tongue, and Claw” — Damien Angelica Walters
“Momma” — Eric J. Guignard
“The Trees Are Tall Here” — Marc E. Fitch
“A Quiet Axe” — Michael Kelly
“The Death of Yatagarasu” — Bethany W. Pope
“The Cooing” — John Claude Smith
“A Knife in My Drawer” — Zdravka Evtimova
“On Balance” — Jason A. Wyckoff
“Learning Not to Smile” — Ralph Robert Moore
“Fisher and Lure” — Christopher Burke
“The Death of Socrates” — Michael Wehunt

GOJIRA!

WFR#4 - Cover

Friends:  just dropping by to change the sign on the ye olde billboard blog, announcing the release of Weird Fiction Review #4, edited by the estimable S.T. Joshi.  Here’s what Centipede Press has to say:

The Weird Fiction Review is an annual periodical devoted to the study of weird and supernatural fiction. It is edited by S.T. Joshi. This fourth issue contains fiction, poetry, and reviews from leading writers and promising newcomers. It features original stories and essays by J. C. Hemphill, Donald Tyson, Mark Fuller Dillon, Ann K. Schwader, Michael Washburn, James Goho; a lengthy interview with Patrick McGrath; an 8-page full-color gallery of art by Bob Eggleton; regular columns by Danel Olson and John Pelan and much more.

If you come by a copy, check out my story, “The Tell-Tale Offal,” a lurid little ditty about the squalid rivalries of young cooks.  As mentioned, this installment features a bevy of striking illustrations by Bob Eggleton.  Here’s a peak at the table of contents:

WFR#4, TOC

GHOULJAW AND OTHER STORIES Looming on the Horizon

Joshi, 2013

Friends:  Among other interesting anecdotes in his April, 2013 blog entry, author and all-around authority on weird fiction, S.T. Joshi, made an announcement referencing my short story collection, Ghouljaw and Other Stories—“a solid volume,” writes Joshi, “of 14 shuddersome tales.”  The collection should be released through Hippocampus Press sometime next year.  Read more here:  S.T.’s blog.

Weird Fiction Review, Issue 1

No foolin’—this is out today

It’s like the arguments of some ardent audiophiles, those enthusiast that (in the digital age of aimlessly yanking a song or two from some disreputable source, absently arranging them in some arbitrary order) maintain that vinyl is the only way to go:  The listener forfeits the essence of the album—the liner notes, the song-to-song sequence, the warmth of the music.  Same could be said for downloading a book or short story.  Easy? Sure.  Convenient? Without doubt.  But think about what you’re missing out on—the art, the weight, the feel of the book.

Okay—yes, so I own a Kindle; but stay with me.  There are some publications which still honor a bygone era of storytelling, aesthetically impressive journals whose sole purpose is to appeal to both our sense of tactility and our imagination.

The Weird Fiction Review, Issue I, is a piece of publishing artwork—a glossy, flap-cover paperback containing 225 pages and a sixteen-page, full color gallery of David Ho’s vibrantly lurid images.  “The Weird Fiction Review is designed to promote serious scholarship in weird and supernatural fiction from the Gothic novels to the present day,” writes S.T. Joshi in his opening editorial, “with an emphasis on the literature of the late nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries.

Fiction contributors include Michaels Aronovitz, Cody Goodfellow, Joseph S. Pulver, Sr., Mare Laidlow, Jason C. Eckhardt, along with yours truly.  There are also eight essays (the focuses of which include Lovecraft, Poe, Blackwood, Stoker, and Gaiman, to name a few), and five poets offering weird work.

Leviathan by David Ho

In the spirit of bygone journals and (sadly) defunct periodicals which prided themselves on promoting the tradition of supernatural tales, S.T. Joshi’s Weird Fiction Review provides a darkly disturbing glimpse at the past, present, and future of dark fiction.

Follow this link to Centipede Press:  www.centipedepress.com

Or check out Amazon.com:  www.amazon.com

And follow this link to David Ho’s website:  www.davidho.com

As always:  thanks for reading, and thank you for your support.