Something Abides After Such Horror: a Review of Daniel Mills’s Collection, AMONG THE LILIES

I initially became acquainted with Mills’s work back in 2014, when I picked up a copy of The Lord Came at Twilight (Dark Renaissance Books), a collection that, I might note, continues to garner much (and well-deserved) praise.  (Bonus:  each story in this volume is supplemented by an illustration by M. Wayne Miller.)  Not long after, I was privileged to have a story appear along with Mills in the inaugural installment of C.M. Muller’s annual anthology, Nightscript (Chthonic Matter, 2015); and it was with the tale therein, “Below the Falls,” that I grew piqued by the author’s storytelling strength.  Among the Lilies (Undertow Publications, 2021) is his latest fiction collection.

Cover art by Yves Tourigny

Using the term “channeling” when assessing Mills’s work, I intend it devoid of pejorative.  Daniel Mills writes without emulation, but his style taps into a medium of Kodachrome antiquity, conjuring an aesthetic of arresting sagacity.  

One can find a number of stories that are period pieces, of a sort — stories that, while paying reverence to traditions ossified by Hawthorne, Bronte, and Brockden Brown, operate as an enhancement to the forms of the Gothic and nineteenth-century supernatural horror.  Mills acknowledges this in sly blips, communicating to his audience, “We talked of music and literature and I admitted even my love of Poe and Hawthorne and to the escape I had found in romances of the darkest character” (“Lilies”).

Other tales, though, are robust in their modern mode.  I’d point to “The Lake” and (a dark little ditty with which I’m particularly enamored) “Dream Children”; I’ve been unable to cast light onto the surface of water at night without a stitch of icy unease since reading it.  The collection is capped off by the impressive novella, “The Account of David Stonehouse, Exile,” which originally appeared as a standalone volume published by Dim Shores in 2016.

Regardless of the era Mills places his readers, he conducts his literary tours with a professorial lack of pretension, revealing stories that are sharp and crisp — tales that hum with neon solemnity.

After all this time, I find Mills’s writing creatively nourishing, and I believe unacquainted readers will find his skills, as one of his characters puts it, “not inconsiderable.”  Conversely, to his steadfast friends:  those who know this, know.  I’ve stated it elsewhere, but it bears repeating:  Deft and unsettling, Daniel Mills’s Among the Lilies is a haunting enhancement of modern horror fiction — an electrically delicate collection of specters.

“Feast Your Eyes…” on Grand October…

With about a month until it’s release, preorders are now available for Nightscript, Vol. VII. Both paperbacks and Kindle editions with be released on October 1, 2021.

For the past seven years, the annual arrival of C.M. Muller’s Nigthscript anthology has been a harbinger of of the Halloween season. But festivities aside, Muller, as editor of various volumes (see Oculus Sinister and Twice-Told), has an astute sense of contemporary tonality; and as such, and as with previous installments, it’s an honor to add some ink to Nightscript. My story, “Feast Your Eyes on the Yawning Monotony of Humdrum Rot,” has been placed on table of contents in league with some remarkable writers:

Feast Your Eyes on the Yawning Monotony of Humdrum Rot — Clint Smith 
The Passing — Joshua Rex
When Sleep At Last — Douglas Thompson
The Summer King’s Day — Timothy Granville
Roadkill — Elin Olausson 
It Looked Like Her — Gordon Brown
Little Gods To Live In Them — David Surface
We Are The Gorillas — Douglas Ford
The Body Trick — Alexander James
Feed  Jason A. Wyckoff
’Neath The Mirror Of The Sea  Rhonda Eikamp
Clipped Wings — Steve Toase
The Cardboard Voice — Tim Major
The Validations  Ashley Stokes
A Perfect Doll — Regina Garza Mitchell
Madam and Yves — Marc Joan
The Delf — Danny Rhodes
Where the Oxen Turned the Plow — Charles Wilkinson
Feast of Fools: A Heartwarming Holiday Romance — LC von Hessen